Best Forex Trading Strategies That Work

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Forex trading strategies that work – as a trader you can do this in 3 simple steps. One of the best Forex trading strategies that really works.

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The information contained on this video is for informational and educational purposes only. We are not registered as a securities broker-dealer or as investment advisers, either with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission or with any state securities regulatory authority.

We are neither licensed nor qualified to provide investment advice. Trading and investing involves substantial risk. Financial loss, even above the amount invested, is possible and common. Seek the services of a competent professional person before investing or trading with money.

The information contained in this video, is not provided to any particular individual with a view toward their individual circumstances and nothing on this video should be construed as investment or trading advice.

Each individual should assume that all information contained in this video is not trustworthy unless verified by their own independent research.

There is a substantial risk for loss when trading securities as they are highly susceptible to the risks and uncertainties of certain economic conditions.

For all these reasons and others, your use of the information provided in this video, or any other products or services, should be based upon your own due diligence and judgment of how best to use the information, and subsequently independently verified by a licensed broker, investment advisor or financial planner.

Any statements and/or examples of earnings or income, including hypothetical or simulated performance results, are solely for illustrative purposes and are not to be considered as average earnings.

Prior successes and past performance with regards to earnings and income are not an indication of potential future success or performance. There can be no assurances of future success or performance and we will not be responsible for the success or failure of any individual or entity which implements information received from this site.

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Past results of any individual trader are not indicative of future returns by that trader, and are not indicative of future returns which may be realized by you.

Neither the author nor publisher assume responsibility or liability for your trading and investment results. This site and all information therein is provided for informational and educational purposes only and should not be construed as investment advice.
The author and/or publisher may hold positions in the stocks, futures or industries discussed here. You should not rely solely on this Information in making any investment. You need to do your own independent research in order to allow you to form your own opinion regarding investments and trading strategies.

It should not be assumed that the information in this web site will result in you being a profitable trader or that it will not result in losses. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. You should never trade with money you cannot afford to lose.

The information in this site is for educational purposes only and in no way a solicitation of any order to buy or sell. The author and publisher assume no responsibility for your trading results. There is an extremely high risk in trading.

This information is provided “AS IS,” without any implied or express warranty as to its performance or to the results that may be obtained by using the information.

Factual statements in this site are made as of the date the information was created and are subject to change without notice.

HYPOTHETICAL OR SIMULATED PERFORMANCE RESULTS HAVE CERTAIN INHERENT LIMITATIONS. UNLIKE AN ACTUAL PERFORMANCE RECORD, SIMULATED RESULTS DO NOT REPRESENT ACTUAL TRADING. ALSO, SINCE THE TRADES HAVE NOT ACTUALLY BEEN EXECUTED, THE RESULTS MAY HAVE UNDER- OR OVER-COMPENSATED FOR THE IMPACT, IF ANY, OF CERTAIN MARKET FACTORS, SUCH AS LACK OF LIQUIDITY. SIMULATED TRADING PROGRAMS IN GENERAL ARE ALSO SUBJECT TO THE FACT THAT THEY ARE DESIGNED WITH THE BENEFIT OF HINDSIGHT. NO REPRESENTATION IS BEING MADE THAT ANY ACCOUNT WILL OR IS LIKELY TO ACHIEVE PROFITS OR LOSSES SIMILAR TO THOSE SHOWN.
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How Exchange Rates Work

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About the video:

You may have traveled a lot and wondered why you get more of one currency when you exchange it for another. If so, you have witnessed exchange rates in action, but do you know how they work? Watch the video to find out what exchange rates are, how to convert between them and the different systems which determine a currencies exchange rate. Historically the gold standard system had been used, which fixed currency to a select value of gold, held in a vault. The three main systems are the floating, managed and fixed exchange rate systems. The floating system has minimal government intervention, using supply and demand to determine the exchange rate. The managed exchange rate is allowed to be within a permitted band and a fixed exchange rate is usually pegged to a currency with the interest of being competitive in the international market. The video explains this in more detail and with helpful picture to guide you through the subject.
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What is a trade deficit? Well, it all has to do with imports and exports and, well, trade. This week Jacob and Adriene walk you through the basics of imports, exports, and exchange. So, you remember the specialization and trade thing, right? So, that leads to imports and exports. Economically, in the aggregate, this is usually a good thing. Globalization and free trade do tend to increase overall wealth. But not everybody wins.

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Lesson 1 – What is Forex and how does It work?

Know your forex terms

Before we delve any deeper into the possibilities that exist in the Forex market, we need to go over some basic Forex market terms.

Pip: A pip (percentage in point) or point, is usually the smallest unit of measurement in the Forex market. Most currency pair quotes are carried out four decimal places—i.e. 1.4500. When you work with Alpari quotes are carried out to the 5th decimal place to provide better pricing. The 5th decimal place represents fractional pips. If the exchange rate of a currency pair moved from 1.45000 to 1.45100, we would say that the price moved up 10 pips. You make money when the pips move your way in a trade.

Note: Any exchange rate that contains the Japanese yen as one of the currencies will only be carried out three decimal places.

Currency Pair: We wouldn’t have a Forex market if we weren’t able to compare the value of one currency against the value of another currency. It is this comparison that drives prices. Forex contracts are always quoted in pairs. The Euro vs. the U.S. dollar (EUR/USD) is the most heavily traded currency pair. The U.S. dollar vs. the Japanese yen (USD/JPY) is another popular pair.

The following is a list of the most common currency pairs, their trading symbols and their nicknames:

Euro vs. U.S. dollar (EUR/USD): “The Euro”

Great Britain Pound vs. U.S. dollar (GBP/USD): “Pound,” “Sterling,” or “The Cable.”

U.S. dollar vs. Swiss franc (USD/CHF): “The Swissie
U.S. dollar vs. Japanese yen (USD/JPY): “The Yen”
U.S. dollar vs. Canadian dollar (USD/CAD): “The CAD,” or “Loonie”
Australian dollar vs. U.S. dollar (AUD/USD): “The Aussie”
New Zealand dollar vs. U.S. dollar (NZD/USD): “The Kiwi”
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