Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt


Price: 00.00
(as of Feb 04,2020 15:28:40 UTC – Details)

00.00

#1 New York Times Bestseller — With a new Afterword

“Guaranteed to make blood boil.” —Janet Maslin, New York Times

In Michael Lewis’s game-changing bestseller, a small group of Wall Street iconoclasts realize that the U.S. stock market has been rigged for the benefit of insiders. They band together—some of them walking away from seven-figure salaries—to investigate, expose, and reform the insidious new ways that Wall Street generates profits. If you have any contact with the market, even a retirement account, this story is happening to you.

Six Days in October: The Stock Market Crash of 1929: A Wall Street Journal Book for Children


Price: $24.99 - $15.16
(as of Jan 31,2020 03:18:26 UTC – Details)

$24.99 - $15.16

Over six terrifying, desperate days in October 1929, the fabulous fortune that Americans had built in stocks plunged with a fervor never seen before. At first, the drop seemed like a mistake, a mere glitch in the system. But as the decline gathered steam, so did the destruction. Over twenty-five billion dollars in individual wealth was lost, vanished gone. People watched their dreams fade before their very eyes. Investing in the stock market would never be the same.
Here, Wall Street Journal bureau chief Karen Blumenthal chronicles the six-day period that brought the country to its knees, from fascinating tales of key stock-market players, like Michael J. Meehan, an immigrant who started his career hustling cigars outside theaters and helped convince thousands to gamble their hard-earned money as never before, to riveting accounts of the power struggles between Wall Street and Washington, to poignant stories from those who lost their savings — and more — to the allure of stocks and the power of greed.
For young readers living in an era of stock-market fascination, this engrossing account explains stock-market fundamentals while bringing to life the darkest days of the mammoth crash of 1929.Atheneum Books for Young Readers

Stock Market: “The Big Board” 1958 New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney

more at http://quickfound.net/

“A Film for Financial Institutions”

‘Presents a study of the working procedures of the New York Stock Exchange. Includes scenes showing the activities of exchange brokers and bidders.’

Originally a public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.
The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Stock_Exchange
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE, nicknamed “The Big Board”) is an American stock exchange located at 11 Wall Street, Lower Manhattan, New York City, New York. It is by far the world’s largest stock exchange by market capitalization of its listed companies at US$30.1 trillion as of February 2018. The average daily trading value was approximately US$169 billion in 2013. The NYSE trading floor is located at 11 Wall Street and is composed of 21 rooms used for the facilitation of trading. A fifth trading room, located at 30 Broad Street, was closed in February 2007. The main building and the 11 Wall Street building were designated National Historic Landmarks in 1978.

The NYSE is owned by Intercontinental Exchange, an American holding company that it also lists (NYSE: ICE). Previously, it was part of NYSE Euronext (NYX), which was formed by the NYSE’s 2007 merger with Euronext…

The earliest recorded organization of securities trading in New York among brokers directly dealing with each other can be traced to the Buttonwood Agreement. Previously securities exchange had been intermediated by the auctioneers who also conducted more mundane auctions of commodities such as wheat and tobacco. On May 17, 1792 twenty four brokers signed the Buttonwood Agreement which set a floor commission rate charged to clients and bound the signers to give preference to the other signers in securities sales. The earliest securities traded were mostly governmental securities such as War Bonds from the Revolutionary War and First Bank of the United States stock, although Bank of New York stock was a non-governmental security traded in the early days. The Bank of North America along with the First Bank of the United States and the Bank of New York were the first shares traded on the New York Stock Exchange.

In 1817 the stockbrokers of New York operating under the Buttonwood Agreement instituted new reforms and reorganized. After sending a delegation to Philadelphia to observe the organization of their board of brokers, restrictions on manipulative trading were adopted as well as formal organs of governance. After re-forming as the New York Stock and Exchange Board the broker organization began renting out space exclusively for securities trading, which previously had been taking place at the Tontine Coffee House. Several locations were used between 1817 and 1865, when the present location was adopted.

The invention of the electrical telegraph consolidated markets, and New York’s market rose to dominance over Philadelphia after weathering some market panics better than other alternatives. The Open Board of Stock Brokers was established in 1864 as a competitor to the NYSE. With 354 members, the Open Board of Stock Brokers rivaled the NYSE in membership (which had 533) “because it used a more modern, continuous trading system superior to the NYSE’s twice-daily call sessions”. The Open Board of Stock Brokers merged with the NYSE in 1869. Robert Wright of Bloomberg writes that the merger increased the NYSE’s members as well as trading volume, as “several dozen regional exchanges were also competing with the NYSE for customers. Buyers, sellers and dealers all wanted to complete transactions as quickly and cheaply as technologically possible and that meant finding the markets with the most trading, or the greatest liquidity in today’s parlance. Minimizing competition was essential to keep a large number of orders flowing, and the merger helped the NYSE to maintain its reputation for providing superior liquidity.” The Civil War greatly stimulated speculative securities trading in New York. By 1869 membership had to be capped, and has been sporadically increased since. The latter half of the nineteenth century saw rapid growth in securities trading.

Securities trade in the latter nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was prone to panics and crashes. Government regulation of securities trading was eventually seen as necessary, with arguably the most dramatic changes occurring in the 1930s after a major stock market crash precipitated the Great Depression…

Likes: 1

Viewed: 25

source

Wall Street: A History, Updated Edition


Price: $19.95 - $109.43
(as of May 06,2019 02:21:27 UTC – Details)

$19.95 - $109.43

Wall Street is an unending source of legend–and nightmares. It is a universal symbol of both the highest aspirations of economic prosperity and the basest impulses of greed and deception. Charles R. Geisst’s Wall Street is at once a chronicle of the street itself–from the days when the wall was merely a defensive barricade built by Peter Stuyvesant–and an engaging economic history of the United States, a tale of profits and losses, enterprising spirits, and key figures that transformed America into the most powerful economy in the world. The book traces many themes, like the move of industry and business westward in the early 19th century, the rise of the great Robber Barons, and the growth of industry from the securities market’s innovative financing of railroads, major steel companies, and Bell’s and Edison’s technical innovations. And because “The Street” has always been a breeding ground for outlandish characters with brazen nerve, no history of the stock market would be complete without a look at the conniving of ruthless wheeler-dealers and lesser known but influential rogues.

This updated edition covers the historic, almost apocalyptic events of the 2008 financial crisis and the overarching policy changes of the Obama administration. As Wall Street and America have changed irrevocably after the crisis, Charles R. Geisst offers the definitive chronicle of the relationship between the two, and the challenges and successes it has fostered that have shaped our history.

The History Of The New York Stock Exchange

One belongs to New York instantly, one belongs to it as much in five minutes as in five years.
– Thomas Wolfe (1900-1938), American short story writer and novelist.

New York has often been described as the center of world business, and if it be so, theres no questioning what is its throbbing heart – the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE). For some time now, no company can be said to have truly arrived until it was listed on the NYSE. Here then, is a short history of the NYSEs long and illustrious career as the barometer of the nations, indeed the worlds, financial health.

The history of the NYSE can be said to have begun in 1792, when twenty-four prominent brokers and merchants gather on Wall Street to sign the Buttonwood Agreement, agreeing to trade securities on a achievement basis. At that time, Bank of New York became the first company to be listed on the New York Stock & Exchange Board.

The first base of operations was at 40 Wall Street in a rented room, which was eventually destroyed in the Great Fire of New York in 1835. In 1863, the name New York Stock Exchange was adopted, and in 1865, it moved to 10-12 Broad Street. As trading multiplied over the next four decades, a larger building was required, and finally inaugurated on on April 22, 1903.

Over the next few decades, the Garage, the Blue Room, the Extended Blue Room and the Bond Room were added. As electronic trading gained popularity, the NYSE decided to close down many of the rooms that had been added by earlier expansions.

Currently, the NYSE is operated by NYSE Euronext, which was formed by the NYSE’s 2007 merger with the fully electronic stock exchange Euronext. This merger brought together major marketplaces across Europe and the United States with histories stretching back more than four centuries. The combination was by far the largest of its kind and the first to create a truly global marketplace.

Even as the NYSE developed into the marketplace of the world, it wasnt all smooth sailing. One of the first shocks occurred when President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated in 1865, leading to the exchange being closed for around a week. Then, in 1920, a bomb exploded outside the NYSE, killing 33 people and injuring more than 400. The scorch marks are still visible on the building.

October 24, 1929 marked the Black Thursday crash at the NYSE, leading to the the sell-off panic which started on Black Tuesday, October 29 and often considered the initiator of the Great Depression. On October 19, 1987, also known as Black Monday, the benchmark index (Dow Jones Industrial Average) dropped 508 points, a 22.6% loss in a single day.

There was also the Mini-Crash of 1989 on October 13, 1989 when a UAL deal went bust, causing the Dow to fall 190.58 points, or 6.91%. The Asian Financial Crisis led to a 7.18% drop in value (554.26 points) on October 27, 1997. There was a sudden 998 point drop on May 6, 2010 but the markets rebounded immediately.

In spite of these hiccups, the NYSE has progressed on its way as the predominant stock exchange in the world with the market capitalization of its listed companies at totaling $ 11.92 trillion as of Aug 2010.

For more information on mlp , please visit our site.

New York Wall Street & Stock Exchange

Wall Street is the office of New York Stock Exchange and known as the financial market in US. It is situated in the lower area in Midtown Manhattan, New York. For many years, this building remained headquarter of many financial institutions are brokers but many of them moved to their own office in other states.

History

The name of Wall Street was taken from the Wall that serves as boundary for the Dutch settlement in Manhattan in the 1600s. Wall Street enjoyed a peak time during 1800s to 1900s but after the 9/11 (September 2001) attacks, many of the financial institutes and brokerage houses moved to other parts of the city. Locals know Wall Street as the “House of Morgan” because the largest bank in Wall Street belongs to the JP Morgan.

New York Stock Exchange

With capital around $ 20 trillion dollars, NY Stock Exchange is the world’s biggest stock exchange market. In 1792, 24 brokers and bankers who signed an agreement named as Buttonwood Agreement suggested New York Stock Exchange. It is named on a buttonwood tree that is located near Wall Street. The agreement consisted of buy and sell systems of the stock exchange company which later became the New York Stock Exchange.

The plan to acquire Archipelago was declared on 21st April 2005. The purpose of this acquisition was to make NYSE a public trading company. NYSE changed its name to NYSE Group on March 8, 2006. The group joined European combined stock market (Euronext) after one year. So, the name of NYSE again changed from NYSE Group to NYSE Euronext. The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of New York Stock Exchange is Marsh Carter.

Visiting Wall Street and the NYSE

Though visitors are not allowed to enter the NYSE trade ground, they can explore the exteriors of the building and the facilities available. The inexpensive way of accessing the NYSE is through bus and subway but you can also take a taxi if in hurry. The rule –not to enter the NYSE trade ground- was decreed after the 9/11 attack.

The Federal Hall National Memorial, which is located in the financial district, is the first capital of US and also President George Washington held the inauguration ceremony here. You will also come across South Street Seaport located at the end of Wall Street. It is a great place for shopping and dining.
Wall Street and NYSE is one of the “do-visit” places in New York and if you are planning to spend some days in NY, you should visit there too. There are more than 3000 companies listed at NYSE. Ranked in top 10 most visited places in New York, NYSE has a visitor-base of over seven hundred thousand people every year. Guided tours are also available for visitors. To know more about the guided tours, please contact NYSE Information Cell.

You might also want to learn about Visit New York United Nations Headquarters and Visit New York Wall Street & Stock Exchange

.

How I learned to read — and trade stocks — in prison | Curtis “Wall Street” Carroll

http://www.youtube.com/v/F89eycANUrQ?fs=1

Financial literacy isn’t a skill — it’s a lifestyle. Take it from Curtis “Wall Street” Carroll. As an incarcerated individual, Caroll knows the power of a dollar. While in prison, he taught himself how to read and trade stocks, and now he shares a simple, powerful message: we all need to be more savvy with our money.

The TED Talks channel features the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design — plus science, business, global issues, the arts and more.

Follow TED on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TEDTalks
Like TED on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TED

Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/TED
Video Rating: / 5