(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates

http://www.youtube.com/v/xwtgByffoUw?fs=1

(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates

How do currency values rise and fall? Why would a country want to manipulate the value of its own currency?

“(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates” by Dr. Mary J. McGlasson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.
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(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates

How do currency values rise and fall? Why would a country want to manipulate the value of its own currency?

"(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates" by Dr. Mary J. McGlasson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

20 thoughts on “(Macro) Episode 33: Exchange Rates

  1. dadamama

    Thank you so much for the video! You should just come to class and teach instead of the guy who was explaining these things throughout the semester without really understanding shit himself.

  2. Dr.Lalita Nanakong

    I needs the IVESTORS TO THAILAND'S MARKET ICBS is my company I am who is holdings A/C BY: Dr.LALITA

  3. Mahin Hossain

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  4. unwanted angel

    I think if your planning a vacation, you could lose your mind worrying about exchange rates. Just use your credit card when you get there. Use banks for currency exchanges to save on added fees.

  5. Dario Nazaret

    Very helpful review, I think it is a good way to begin understanding about exchange rate. So far I have been working with grathaw trade predictions expert, you can google it and find more information about it.

  6. Julia G.

    Why would the foreign country keep its good (in this case, Canada and its lumber) at the same price ($50,000 Canadian dollars) if its currency were depreciating and the good was worth more than 50,000 Canadian dollars in the reduced dollar value?  I recognize how that could be beneficial to the economy as a whole, but why would the individual producers want to sell their lumber for less than its worth (as U.S. citizens are plausibly willing to pay almost US$50,000 for it, not accounting for inflation or the appreciated currency, because that wouldn't make enough of a difference to make the lumber worth only US$32,000), or less than market equilibrium?

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